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david petraeus spent his last fourth of july as commander of the u.s. forces in afghanistan. he met with american troops in the war zone, and just two weeks before heading home to take on his new job as cia director, he spoke one on one with nbc about america's mission. >> happy fourth of july to all of you. >> reporter: it's his eighth fourth of july in a combat zone, but the last in uniform for general david petraeus. he spent the day visiting some of the thousands of u.s. troops stationed in afghanistan. a farewell tour for a general many consider a rock star who found himself asking these tough as nails troops to just relax. >> the best way to relax is to put your hands in your pockets. that means you right there. go ahead. in fact, i'll put them in my pockets, too, here. >> reporter: credited with helping turn the iraq war around, petraeus was tapped by president obama a year ago to do the same in afghanistan. he admits it hasn't been easy. >> i never felt we could flip afghanistan the way we were able to flip iraq. >> reporter: a tough situation, but he insists not hopeless. >
night between front line troops in afghanistan and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen who's visiting them this weekend. somewhat unbelievably, several u.s. troops said their major concern was not getting paid because of this budget fight in washington. in response, mullen was blunt. he said it would be devastating. well, today our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski followed up in an exclusive conversation with admiral mullen. >> reporter: brian, admiral mullen fully expected to talk to the soldiers and marines about the war here in afghanistan. not the one in washington. >> they weren't talking about afghanistan. they weren't talking about the fight they were in. this isn't surprising, but when you're deployed you want to make sure everything's okay at home. >> soldiers and marines in the middle of a war zone worrying about getting paid. >> they always worry about getting paid. they just sort of expect it to happen. >> reporter: you said that if, in fact, paychecks were held up, that many in the services would be devastated by missing a single paycheck
. they include, of course, those who have died in iraq and afghanistan in tonight's making a difference report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars and have joined forces to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own healing, taryn began reaching out to other widows. but talk
attack victims and fallen soldiers. tony just found out that his son james who died in afghanistan in 2006 may not only have had his cell phone hacked into, but also his e-mail. >> they have hacked into a dead soldier, it's despicable. what else would you say? what on earth did they think they were going to find? >> reporter: in the words of the prime minister, people trust the police to protect them, politicians to represent them and the press to inform them. and says the british public has been failed by all three. michelle kosinski, nbc news, london. >>> in the middle east where fridays are typically the biggest day for protests, following friday prayers, hundreds of thousands were out on the streets of syria again demanding regime change, and in egypt, protesters are back in the streets, back in tahrir square. it's been five months now since mubarak was forced out, since we were there to cover it. there was so much hope back then, but there's now growing anger over the pace of change and growing concern about who olds the power. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel fin
in afghanistan from asking her out. >> i'm sergeant moore, but you can call me scott. i wanted to take a moment out of my day to invite you to the ball in greenville, north carolina. take a second, think about it and get back to me. >> 90,000 people have seen that video since sergeant moore posted it on tuesday. no word yet on whether she's seen the invitation or whether she'll attend. >> she should go. >> she should. >> she has 90,000 instant fans. >> they'll probably go viral so it will be close to a million tomorrow. >> he might not be an officer but he's obviously a gentlemen. >> what the word? rain? >>> it was on the warm side. we made it to 92 today but the dew point is, the real way it feels from a moisture standpoint in the atmosphere, the due point dropped down into the comfortable 50s this afternoon and that made all the difference. it will make the same amount of difference tomorrow. you need to get outside and enjoy your sunday because we all know if it's washington and it's the summertime, humidity cannot be gone for too long and it will be back and i mean soon. outside, on a beaut
the ongoing combat in afghanistan. mexico matmatters. it's the most important country along with canada on the face of the earth. >> gang violence claumed the lives of 15,000 people last year alone. it's estimatedt 1200ó[Ñiw3Ñiw3 president felipe calderon declared war on organized crime in 2006, some 40,000 people have been killed in the cross-fire of gangs fighting for lucrative drug routes into the united states. >> this is not just a drug fight. this is a struggle for the future of mexico. >> reporter: but with so much rampant killing, many question the mexican government's ability to successfully win its war on drugs. kevin tibbles, nbc news, new york. >>> back now on this side of the border, for all their glamour, the duke and duchess of cambridge, william and kate, spent part of this day in one of the less glamorous parts of los angeles as they wrapped up their visit to north america. nbc's kate snow is there for us tonight. kate, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. it is just about over now. the duke and duchess just arriving at l.a.x. they will be leaving shortl
else in common, too. they are all military widows who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was just 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was "i love you more than life itself." >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world, i just felt like they didn't want to embrace, you know, who i was, which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, you know, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own healing taryn began reaching out to other widows. but talking alone wasn't enough. soon taryn started organizing events like parasailing, surfing, even swimming with dolphins, to bring this courageous group of women together in what she called the american widow project. >> i found myself laughing and smiling for the first time. and i look around, and here's a group of extraordinary women who know the level of pai
arrived in iraq sunday after a visit to afghanistan. it's his first visit since taking office july 1st. three or four rockets hit the green zone in baghdad early this morning, an apparent signal from insurgents that they were aware of panetta's arrival. 15 soldiers were killed in iraq last month. panetta said iraqi extremists are being armed by iran with sophisticated weapons they're using to find and kill american forces. >> we're very concerned about iran and weapons they're providing to extremists here in iraq. and the reality is that we've seen the results of that in june. we lost a hell of a lot of americans as a result of those attacks. >> reporter: secretary panetta also said he is requesting that iraqi security forces step up security for american troops. if that doesn't happen, he said he has the sole authority to order u.s. military forces to conduct combat operations against the insurgents. >>> the fbi is leading an investigation into the discovery of a stun gun on board a jetblue airplane. cleaning staff found the device, which closely resembles a smartphone in the back sea
guardsman who has deployed to iraq or afghanistan, but they are not the only ones of carrying the burden of military service. >> we so often hear people say, support the troops. we don't often hear them say, we support the families of the troops. is part of this making that awareness? >> yes. the military families are serving, as well. >> reporter: the cost of that service from the emotional anxiety of having a loved one at war to relocation and job changes, to home upkeep is what first lady, michelle obama, and dr. biden want people it know about. >> we went around the country for about two years and listened and heard about the problems and some of the things that we could do. >> whether you're a business leader -- >> reporter: in april they teamed up -- >> each of us can show our appreciation for everything these families do. >> reporter: to promote a white house initiative called joining forces. >> people don't know that someone in their neighborhood, their school, their church is deployed. here is a single mom or a single dad who is trying to take care of the kids and manage everyth
david petraeus is spending his last independence day as u.s. commander in afghanistan at a re-enlistment ceremony in kandahar province today. he was confirmed to become the director of cia last week. >>> one more thing to be proud of the u.s. special olympics team and new cache of gold medals in athens, team usa celebrates the closing ceremonies of those games today. >>> it is now 7:09. back to savannah, willie, and maria. big congratulations to all of them. >> great to see that. al has the morning off. let's get the weather al has the morning off. let's get the weather from maria la rosa. what's the holiday forecast of you know what, a great july 4th for a lot of people, a typical july day. some showers and thunderstorms expected across the tennessee, ohio valleys, parts of the southeast as well and across the west, lots of sunshine. let's see how it's going to impact fireworks displays tonight. your evening forecast showing a few areas of showers and thunderstorms again in the tennessee southeast, tennessee valley in the southeast, also the northern plains. of course the big
to pay tribute to the country's combat role in afghanistan. >> i'm really excited. yeah. >> reporter: canada rolled out the red carpet for these royals. spectators, young and old, showed up for a glimpse of the glamorous pair. some waiting more than six hours. and kate's fashion influence filled the crowd. how important is she as a fashion icon? >> pretty important. >> pretty important. >> reporter: from fascinators to a tennis dress, and of course there were plenty of flowers for a potential future queen. >> she bent down and chatted with you, didn't she? >> she asked us what's our name. and she said the flowers were very pretty. >> reporter: would you like to look like her when you're grown up? >> yes. >> reporter: william and kate's trip reminded more than a few here of another royal couple, prince chalks and diana visited the country in 1983 just a couple of years after they married. >> i was here covering charles and diana's trip to ottawa and william was just a baby at that time. so for me, it's quite poignant to come here, seeing him now married and representing his country. >
that his son, james, who died in afghanistan in 2006 may have had not only his cell phone tapped into by the news of the world, but also his e-mail. >> they hacked into a dead soldier. this is despicable. what else can you say? what on earth do they think they're going to find. >> in the words of the prime minister, people trust the police to protect them, politicians to represent them, and the press to inform them. and, he says, the british public has been failed by all three. and, amy, this storiens to spread, to spread to the united states where one of the most senior executives now runs dow jones in new york but used to run this operation and possibly to spread to other newspapers. it's no exaggeration to say it threatens british tabloid journalism as we know it. >>> thanks for the latest. time now with a check of your weekend weather with bill karins >>> a good saturday morning to you. i'm meteorologist chuck bell. welcome to your weekend. no need to worry about severe weather today. after the thunderstorms blew through here yesterday, weather has improved. a clear sky overh
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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